More on Bulgaria– Nessebar

Nessebar is a picturesque island that has been connected to the mainland by a short land bridge. From afar, it looks a bit like a very large lollipop on the end of a very short stick.

Nessebar has a long and interesting history. It is a UNESCO World Heritage Site. It is a place that tourists love to visit because it is quaint and inviting and it is filled with small shops that feature all sorts of items, many of them local products.

Honey jars- pottery that is characteristically Bulgarian

Honey jars- pottery that is characteristically Bulgarian

The honey jars were not expensive, but they were filled with locally produced honey which made them problematic as there was no indication it was kosher.

A typical street in Nessebar

A typical street in Nessebar

Most of the homes in Nessebar are built of stone on the first level and of wood on the second. the wooden second floor is sometimes cantilevered over the street or into the yard area. Although Nessebar reminded us both of Rhodes, the architecture is more irregular and the wood gives it a more European look.

A quiet street in Nessebar

A quiet street in Nessebar

You might notice that the stones on the street are not very even. Walking there is a challenge. “Watch your step” takes on new meaning. One of the more frustrating sights we saw was someone trying to wheel a disabled person in a wheelchair on one of these streets. Impossible. She turned back despite our offers of help. The main street entering the city has a paved road and the road at the perimeter that leads to the seaport is also paved, but that’s about it. It is not a friendly place for people who have mobility problems.

A church

A church

Our guide told us that Nessebar, this tiny island/peninsula had 40 churches. Indeed, it seemed there was one on just about every block. They all looked more or less like this one. Some are in ruins, some are used as art galleries, and some are just abandoned. There is at least one large impressive church that is still in use.

Strolling around Nessebar, we saw people from England, Russia, Poland, and of course, Romanians and Bulgarians. And what was the language we heard again and again (our little tour group consisted of just us and Brits and Poles) — Hebrew, of course!

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